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Data Provider: Welsh Government National Statistics Average (mean) gross weekly earnings by UK country - English region and year (£)
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Measure[Filtered]
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Year[Filter]
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[Collapse]Area 1
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[Collapse]Area 2
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Area 3
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[Collapse]United Kingdom373393408425450472487506498516538535550576587599606603608620621(r) 627(p) 644
United Kingdom[Collapse]Great Britain374394409427452474489508500518539537553578590601608605610622623(r) 629(p) 646
Great Britain[Collapse]England379400415433459482497517508526547544561587597609616613617629630(r) 636(p) 652
EnglandNorth East335346356373384401409436434452468465473496509522534531535553557(r) 574(p) 569
North West353370380395414434448469463478497494516529540552547545551566572(r) 574(p) 593
Yorkshire and the Humber337352367380397417437456450467482479495515528536541537543553555(r) 567(p) 576
East Midlands342357368379398420436451443468492489497527542549544541548557557(r) 562(p) 572
West Midlands345367383393424434442464455475493491503527537547548544552570566(r) 574(p) 597
East369387404422444464488510497510531527541562568578580576580596593(r) 608(p) 623
London489516537572607641659681667697716714730773785802826822814821819(r) 812(p) 832
South East388413430448477508522537529539567567584604616625629630641640643656(p) 669
South West349361372385413429449464458472491489511528537545548546551567568(r) 578(p) 594
[Collapse]WalesWales337349359373386405422444438455469466472498506516519516521538539(r) 550(p) 566
[Collapse]ScotlandScotland344360377389411435447461456479504500515536555570575572585599600607(p) 623
[Collapse]Northern Ireland[Collapse]Northern IrelandNorthern Ireland328340352368382397412433431451472469472487509510529526536541538(r) 554(p) 578

Metadata

Title
Average earnings data by UK country/English region

Last update
26 October 2016 26 October 2016

Next update
October 2017

Publishing organisation
Welsh Government

Source 1
Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, Office for National Statistics

Contact email
economic.stats@wales.gsi.gov.uk

Designation
National Statistics

Lowest level of geographical disaggregation
UK regions

Geographical coverage
UK regions

Languages covered
English only

Data licensing
You may use and re-use this data free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government License - see http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence

General description
These data show average gross weekly earnings in pounds for the local authorities and aggregations thereof in April of the years shown. The data relate to full-time employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey period was not affected by absence.

Data collection and calculation
The figures are taken from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) run by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). In 2004, the ASHE replaced the New Earnings Survey (NES) by introducing a new methodology into the calculation of earnings data. This new methodology applies weights to the results to take account of the structure of the population in terms of age, gender and occupation and area of workplace (the latter being in London and the South East or elsewhere in the UK). The NES data for 1997 to 2003 have been reworked to provide a back-series of earnings data using the new methodology.
There were further changes to the ASHE methodology in 2005 as a result of the introduction of a new questionnaire. 2004 data have been reworked to be comparable with this new methodology, but it has not been possible to do this for earlier years. Thus there is a discontinuity in the data that must be taken account of when making comparisons in earnings data over time. To help with this, there are two estimates for 2004, one on the previous basis (referred to as excluding supplementary survey information) and one on the new basis (referred to as including supplementary survey information).
In 2007 and 2008, there was a sample reduction of around 20 per cent. The sample reduction has been designed to be biggest in those industries where earnings exhibit lower levels of variation.
A new automatic coding system for occupations was introduced in 2007. The main impact of this has been to move a number of jobs away from the top occupational groups to other occupational groups. This has tended to lower the average earnings in the top occupational groups and to lower earnings overall. Partly in response to the change to the sample design, an additional weighting stratum has been introduced for those large enterprises which submit electronic returns to the survey (special arrangements). There has been no reduction in the sample amongst these enterprises. The ONS has produced a version of the 2006 ASHE results which includes the automatic occupational coding change and the special arrangements weighting stratum. This enables year-on-year comparisons to be made which take account of these two changes. These are referred to as 2006 (consistent with 2005) and 2006 (consistent with 2007).
In 2009 the original sample size was re-instated. Please note that due to small sample sizes it is also not advisable to make year-on-year comparisons at a local authority level. To get around this, a set of aggregations of local authorities has been created, for which comparisons over time can be considered more robust. These aggregations group similar local authorities together and are wholly enclosed within the NUTS2 boundaries in Wales that are used to determine European Funding allocations. Figures for the two NUTS2 areas (West Wales and the Valleys and East Wales) are also included.
As the results come from a survey, the results are sample-based estimates and therefore subject to differing degrees of sampling variability, i.e. the true value for any measure lies in a differing range about the estimated value. This range or sampling variability increases as the detail in the data increases, for example regional data are subject to higher variability than the Great Britain or United Kingdom data.
Where the estimate for any cell in this dataset is not considered to be precise (due to excessive sampling variability), a cellnote is included against the estimate indicating the quality rating as either reasonably precise [marked by (!)] or acceptable [marked by (!!)]. Where such a cellnote exists, particularly the latter, or in cases where the variability exceeds acceptable limits and is suppressed, it is recommended that the user moves up to the next level in the hierarchical aggregation of areas if using the figure in any analysis, particularly if considering change over time.

Frequency of publication
Annual

Data reference periods
1997 to 2016

Revisions information
Data for the latest year are provisional and are revised on the release on the next years data.

Statistical quality
The figures are taken from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) run by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). In 2004, the ASHE replaced the New Earnings Survey (NES) by introducing a new methodology into the calculation of earnings data. This new methodology applies weights to the results to take account of the structure of the population in terms of age, gender and occupation and area of workplace (the latter being in London and the South East or elsewhere in the UK). The NES data for 1997 to 2003 have been reworked to provide a back-series of earnings data using the new methodology.
There were further changes to the ASHE methodology in 2005 as a result of the introduction of a new questionnaire. 2004 data have been reworked to be comparable with this new methodology, but it has not been possible to do this for earlier years. Thus there is a discontinuity in the data that must be taken account of when making comparisons in earnings data over time. To help with this, there are two estimates for 2004, one on the previous basis (referred to as excluding supplementary survey information) and one on the new basis (referred to as including supplementary survey information).
In 2007 and 2008, there was a sample reduction of around 20 per cent. The sample reduction has been designed to be biggest in those industries where earnings exhibit lower levels of variation.
A new automatic coding system for occupations was introduced in 2007. The main impact of this has been to move a number of jobs away from the top occupational groups to other occupational groups. This has tended to lower the average earnings in the top occupational groups and to lower earnings overall. Partly in response to the change to the sample design, an additional weighting stratum has been introduced for those large enterprises which submit electronic returns to the survey (special arrangements). There has been no reduction in the sample amongst these enterprises. The ONS has produced a version of the 2006 ASHE results which includes the automatic occupational coding change and the special arrangements weighting stratum. This enables year-on-year comparisons to be made which take account of these two changes. These are referred to as 2006 (consistent with 2005) and 2006 (consistent with 2007).
In 2009 the original sample size was re-instated. Please note that due to small sample sizes it is also not advisable to make year-on-year comparisons at a local authority level. To get around this, a set of aggregations of local authorities has been created, for which comparisons over time can be considered more robust. These aggregations group similar local authorities together and are wholly enclosed within the NUTS2 boundaries in Wales that are used to determine European Funding allocations. Figures for the two NUTS2 areas (West Wales and the Valleys and East Wales) are also included.
As the results come from a survey, the results are sample-based estimates and therefore subject to differing degrees of sampling variability, i.e. the true value for any measure lies in a differing range about the estimated value. This range or sampling variability increases as the detail in the data increases, for example regional data are subject to higher variability than the Great Britain or United Kingdom data.
Where the estimate for any cell in this dataset is not considered to be precise (due to excessive sampling variability), a cellnote is included against the estimate indicating the quality rating as either reasonably precise [marked by (!)] or acceptable [marked by (!!)]. Where such a cellnote exists, particularly the latter, or in cases where the variability exceeds acceptable limits and is suppressed, it is recommended that the user moves up to the next level in the hierarchical aggregation of areas if using the figure in any analysis, particularly if considering change over time.

Weblinks
www.ons.gov.uk

Keywords
Average weekly earnings